BEHAVE.org 6th Annual Testing Awards Recap

We’ve created a recap of the top 4 tests, currently competing to win the 6th Annual BEHAVE.org Testing Awards.

Don’t forget to vote for your favorite test — the winner will be announced Wednesday, May 17th.

Test #1: Staatsloterij/Greenhouse Group

Lottery Ticket Image in Navigational Menu

Test Summary:

To drive more ticket sales and take advantage of available screen real estate, the Dutch lottery company, Staatsloterij, worked with Greenhouse Group digital marketing agency to optimize the lottery site’s navigational experience.

In version A, no ticket graphic was displayed. In version B, a lottery ticket graphic advertising a 10-ticket pack was displayed.

The team suspected visually promoting the more expensive ticket package would lead to a higher purchase rate, driving increased revenue.

The two versions appeared like this:

Version A: No graphic shown Version B: Graphic shown

Winner:

Version B, the navigational menu with the ticket graphic led to a 4.3% lift in ticket purchases, resulting in a 28% surge in revenue per user.

Interestingly, however, increased conversions were not driven by the more expensive 10-ticket pack featured in the graphic, but rather by increased purchases of single tickets. Players were likely motivated by the guaranteed winnings obtained from purchasing more tickets so bought additional tickets in hopes of increasing their winning chances.

Take Away:

Visually enticing players, by appealing to their desire to win, can be win-win for both players and website retailers.

To read more about this test, click here.

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Test #2: World Wildlife Fund

Free Tote Bag Incentive Offer

Test Summary:

To solicit more donations, the World Wildlife Fund, the world’s leading conservation organization, conducted an email donation campaign, testing whether offering a donation incentive, in the form of a bison-themed tote bag, would encourage potential donors to give.

In version A, no incentive was advertised in the email. However, if readers clicked to make a donation they could later chose to select a tote bag. In version B, the incentive was clearly visible in the email.

The team suspected showcasing the incentive in the email would motivate potential donors to give, resulting in more donations.

The two versions appeared like this:

Version A: No incentive advertised Version B: Incentive shown

Winner:

Version A, the email campaign offering the reward achieved more opens, but less donations, showing that, the reward captured visitors, but didn’t necessarily make them convert.

Interestingly, those people who saw the offer in the email were 82% more likely to claim the reward those donors who chose to donate without knowing about the free tote bag.

Take Away:

Although rewards offer incentive, they don’t necessarily attract the right people — and may just end up being more overhead cost.

To read more about this test, click here.

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Test #3: Dela/Greenhouse Group

Reduced Clutter for Wi-fi vs. Cellular Users

Test Summary:

To determine if users on wi-fi connection convert differently than those on a cellular connection, Dela, a Dutch cooperative, worked with Greenhouse Group digital media agency to test the effect of removing content from a product display page.

In version A, wi-fi and cellular users were shown a product page full of context and information. In version B, much of the content was stripped away. Only the central Calls To Action (CTAs) remained.

The team suspected leaving only the CTAs would result in a higher Clickthrough rate (CTR) to receive an insurance quote, especially for distracted wi-fi users.

The two versions appeared like this:

Version A: Product page with context Version B: Stripped away content

Winner:

Version B, the shorter, more goal-oriented product page, with only actionable areas remaining, performed best – for both cellular and wi-fi users.

For cellular users, the less cluttered product page led to a 16% conversion uplift, compared to the more content-heavy page. For wi-fi users, the cleaner page created an 11% conversion uplift, compared to the more cluttered page.

Take Away:

The less cluttered page performed well for both cellular and wi-fi users, but was best for cellular users, who tend to be on the go and have multiple distractions during their online and offline journey. In addition to considering screen size, marketers should also take into account the conversion effect of whether a mobile user is on a cellular or wi-fi connection.

To read more about this test, click here.

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Test #4: Ancestry.com

Package Names

Test Summary:

To increase website subscribers, Ancestry.com, the world’s largest genealogy company, tested whether changing the name of their membership packages would impact conversions.

In version A, the title described the type of packages available for purchase. In version B, the title was catchy, instead of descriptive.

The team suspected making the package names more descriptive would clarify the service offering, increasing subscribers.

The two versions appeared like this:

Version A: Descriptive package names Version B: Fancy package names

Winner:

Version A, with the descriptive titles, led to a 9% increase in the number of gross subscribers.

Take Away:

Text that is immediately clear will likely convert better than descriptions that sound fancy and allude to something, but are not readily decipherable.

To read more about this test, click here.

If you think this test deserves the winning title: